Ministers for the Department of Infrastructure https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/ Latest releases from the Ministers en Tenders called for Newcastle Inner City Bypass https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/tenders-called-newcastle-inner-city-bypass <p class="MsoNormal">Progress on the fifth section of the Newcastle Inner City Bypass has taken a step forward, with tenders called for major work on the $450 million section of the bypass between Rankin Park and Jesmond.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said the Australian Government has committed $360 million to build this section of road, as part of its record $110 billion 10-year infrastructure pipeline.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“The Federal Government is committed to busting congestion and reducing travel times through this multi-million-dollar investment in the Newcastle Inner City Bypass,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“Once the bypass is complete, commuters will enjoy up to an 80 per cent reduction in travel times during the morning and afternoon peaks, bypassing 11 sets of traffic lights between Rankin Park and Jesmond.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">New South Wales Minister for Transport and Roads Andrew Constance said the New South Wales Government has committed $90 million towards the project, which is expected to create up to 900 jobs during major works.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“The Newcastle Inner City Bypass has been designed to remove up to 30,000 vehicles each day from Lookout Road, Croudace Street and Newcastle Road – truly returning local roads to local residents,” Mr Constance said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“Utility relocation is continuing at the southern end of the bypass route, with the early works expected to be completed by July 2022.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Senator for New South Wales Hollie Hughes said the Newcastle Inner City Bypass is an important congestion-busting project for one of the busiest roads in the region.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“I welcome the Federal Government’s continued commitment alongside the New South Wales State Government to bring this project to fruition,” Senator Hughes said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Transport for NSW called for registrations of interest for the tender process in early 2021, with tenders now called from the three shortlisted contractors:</p> <ul> <li class="MsoListParagraphCxSpFirst">John Holland Pty Ltd;</li> <li class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle">Fulton Hogan Construction Pty Ltd and;</li> <li class="MsoListParagraphCxSpLast">NEWLink - BMD Constructions Pty Ltd and Ditchfield Contracting Pty Ltd Joint Venture.</li> </ul> <p class="MsoNormal">The tender process will be open for 12 weeks until Friday 17 December.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Transport for NSW is working closely with NSW Health to ensure the project aligns with work on the John Hunter Health Innovation Precinct project and to provide a second access road to the hospital campus.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">The tender for Rankin Park to Jesmond is expected to be awarded early next year, with construction starting in the second half of the year. The bypass is expected to open to traffic in 2025.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">More information about the project is available at: <a href="http://nswroads.work/rp2j">nswroads.work/rp2j</a></p> <h2 class="MsoNormal"><strong>Media contact:</strong></h2> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Deputy Prime Minister</strong> – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Minister Constance</strong> – Kaycie Bradford | 0417 129 445 | <a href="mailto:Kaycie.Bradford@minister.nsw.gov.au">Kaycie.Bradford@minister.nsw.gov.au</a></p> Joyce Tenders called for Newcastle Inner City Bypass Critical M1 upgrade complete https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/fletcher/media-release/critical-m1-upgrade-complete <p>A game-changing upgrade of the M1 northbound between Sports Drive and the Gateway Motorway is now open, cutting travel times and improving traffic flow for drivers.</p> <p>The 3.5-kilometre upgrade, part of the broader $750 million, eight-kilometre M1 Eight Mile Plains to Daisy Hill project, is complete with all five lanes now open to traffic.</p> <p>The Morrison Government is funding $510 million towards the M1 Eight Mile Plains to Daisy Hill upgrade and the Queensland Government is contributing $240 million.</p> <p>Federal Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, said this important upgrade would help the tens of thousands of motorists who drive between Sports Drive and Gateway Motorway every day get home sooner and safer.</p> <p>“This project is one of many critical infrastructure projects to receive funding from the Morrison Government as part of its record $110 billion, 10-year infrastructure investment pipeline, which is helping to drive Australia’s economic recovery,” Minister Fletcher said</p> <p>“By alleviating congestion along critical sections of roads like this one, we’re helping people to get home to their families sooner and safer, we’re helping freight move more quickly between our cities, and we’re generating jobs across the country.”</p> <p>Queensland Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey said the Palaszczuk Government was delivering a record $27.5 billion roads and transport plan which would create 24,000 jobs and drive the state’s economic recovery from COVID-19.</p> <p>“This includes the massive upgrades currently underway as part of the Pacific Motorway program, from as far north as Eight Mile Plains to Tugun in the south,” Mr Bailey said.</p> <p>“Through this program, the Palaszczuk Government is delivering additional lanes on the M1, improved service roads, interchange upgrades and the Coomera Connector – dubbed the second M1. </p> <p>“With construction on the Gold Coast’s first ever diamond diverging interchange kicking off in Burleigh and preconstruction activities underway for Coomera Connector Stage one, we are powering on with our commitment to build a better M1.</p> <p>“The South East is predicted to be one of the highest growing regions in the state, so projects like these not only help get people home sooner, but also keep traffic flowing well into the future.”</p> <p>Federal Member for Bonner Ross Vasta said more than $3.4 billion worth of major upgrades are being delivered on the M1, jointly funded by the Morrison Government and Queensland Government.</p> <p>“This massive investment includes these upgrades between Eight Mile Plains and Daisy Hill, as well as from Daisy Hill to Logan Motorway and Varsity Lakes to Tugun further south,” Mr Vasta said.</p> <p>“The Morrison Government is proud to be providing $510 million towards the M1 Eight Mile Plains to Daisy Hill upgrade, busting congestion and supporting 721 jobs over the project’s life to boost our economic recovery.”</p> <p>State Member for Springwood Mick De Brenni said the M1 upgrade was also progressing well on other sections, with two new bridges taking shape over Springwood Road and piling for the Veloway bridge over Lexington Road completed on the Watland Street to Sports Drive upgrade.</p> <p>"The whole of South-East Queensland will be reaping the benefits of this generational investment for years to come, meaning it will drive our economic recovery and strength for years,” Mr de Brenni said.</p> <p>“Hundreds of thousands of motorists drive up this strip each day and so with the Veloway extension now open, we’re also encouraging some of them to use active transport instead, meaning even less congestion.</p> <p>"The Palaszczuk Government is proud to be delivering more motorway lanes, a busway extension, more options and backing in the local businesses and over 750 local jobs that have made this stage of the project possible.</p> <p>“A big thank you to everyone for your patience as we’ve delivered this huge infrastructure upgrade and thanks in advance as we move to the next stages south through Springwood to Loganholme.”</p> <p>Member for Waterford Shannon Fentiman said this project will boost jobs and support our economic recovery.</p> <p>“The Palaszczuk Government is not only delivering a record road and transport infrastructure investment for Queensland, we are doing it in a sustainable way and creating more jobs for Queenslanders,” Ms Fentiman said.</p> <p>Mr Bailey said the project had achieved another ‘Leading’ design rating from the Infrastructure Sustainability Council (ISC).  </p> <p>“To achieve the highest possible rating for infrastructure projects again is an amazing achievement for the team,” he said.</p> <p>“In a first for Queensland, a new fish passage has been created at Bulimba Creek Tributary (Big Al’s Brook) using a unique design of pools to mimic natural habitats and help fish populations thrive.</p> <p>“Recycled glass has also been trialled in bedding material. The reuse of waste materials reduces emissions and is now being specified on other Transport and Main Roads (TMR) projects as part of the growing circular economy.</p> <p>“TMR has truly encompassed best practice in the infrastructure industry, having undergone ISC's rigorous rating system for evaluating sustainability and exceeding expectations.”</p> <p>Member for Mansfield Corrine McMillan said 95 per cent of workers on the Sports Drive to Gateway Motorway upgrade were sourced from the local community.</p> <p>“Projects such as these are benefiting the local workforce and boosting the economic recovery from COVID-19,” Ms McMillan said.</p> <p>“We’re sustaining local workforces, and growing capacity through training.</p> <p>“Four per cent of workers on this package are women, and 2.6 per cent are from indigenous communities.</p> <p>“More than 21,000 hours of training have been completed across the workforce, with five apprentices developing their skills on the job.</p> <p>“It is important we are able to give back social and economic benefits for every cent we invest.”</p> <p>Member for Toohey Peter Russo said bike riders would also benefit from the Sports Drive to Gateway Motorway upgrade with the first part of the extended Veloway 1 now open.</p> <p>“Investment in South East Queensland's bike paths is a game changer for active commuters,” Mr Russo said.</p> <p>“This is the first section of the V1 Veloway missing link completed and means riders can travel further south than ever before with local access connections at Logan Road, Underwood Road and Camelot Park.</p> <p>“The aim is for the V1 to go all the way down to Paradise Road by 2025.”</p> Fletcher Critical M1 upgrade complete Interview with Hamish Macdonald, ABC Radio National https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/interview/interview-hamish-macdonald-abc-radio-national <p class="Normal0"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD:</strong> Barnaby Joyce is the Nationals leader and the Acting Prime Minister, a very good morning to you.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>Good morning, Hamish, how are you? And good morning listeners.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>I'm very well, thank you. Do you agree with everything Josh Frydenberg is saying, do you support Australia moving to net‑zero by 2030 ‑ 2050 rather?</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>I think we are already wishing to be there, even earlier. I think that's the statement of the Prime Minister. We have to be very mindful, especially of what's happening in England, a six‑fold increase in the last year. I think we've had 250 per cent increase in gas prices in the last 12 months. We've had 13 energy companies collapse since 2020. And to quote The Guardian, so people know where my sources are, they say that they're now having to switch on coal fired power stations at a great cost to cover the energy shortfall. This was after a long winter in England last year, in the United Kingdom, and it goes to show that the consequences now are on jobs, are on agriculture, even the capacity to feed themselves, and this is not just in England, it's across Europe. It's something we should be aware of. Now why should we be aware of it? Because we've got to make sure in any decision we make that we don't replicate the mistakes of England, of the United Kingdom, suffer the consequences of what's happening in Europe or the consequences will be ours. We've got to make sure we maintain sovereignty in our capacity to finance the issues, which are our largest export in our nation, largest export in our nation are fossil fuels. If you don't want them you must, to be responsible, go through and decide which issues, which services, which pensions, that you also acknowledge you don't have the capacity to finance as you once did. Now –</p> <p><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD</strong>: I do want to get to the finance thing because that's what Josh Frydenberg is talking about today. But just to be clear for our listeners, you do support net‑zero by 2050?</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>I've got no problems with any plan that does not leave regional areas hurt. I have to explain, as do my colleagues have to explain, that we make sure we don't have net‑zero losses in regional areas, that we don’t have net‑zero losses in Muswellbrook, in Central Queensland, and that we don't put our economy at threat, we don't tip our capacity to pay for the substantive service such as the ABC by putting ourselves in the position, which is not fanciful. It is where England is right – it's where the United Kingdom is right now.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>Sure.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>And that should be also a section for one of your programs to investigate exactly what happened there, because the investigation into renewables is not only –</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>I think there's a separation between the Government and what the ABC does in terms of its investigations, Deputy Prime Minister.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>Not really, we have to pay for you and that's a substantive part of the budget.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>I think we all know there's editorial independence. Australia's interests lie in our markets functioning effectively the Treasurer is saying today, so that the financial system remains stable, investors are able to make informed and timely decisions and capital can be accessed at the lowest possible cost. Regional areas need that too, don't they?</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>Well capital should be also accessible without the imposed views of certain people within that organisation. Remember the heads of superannuation funds are not there because they own the money, they administer other people's money by reason of being a very good applicant of the job interviews, as is the case ‑‑</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>But we're not just talking about super funds, we're talking about the imported capital that Australia relies on for our economy to function.</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>Yes, and that's precisely right, Hamish, for our economy to function. You have hit the nail right on the head. We have to make sure our economy can function. We have to make sure that we earn the money. I know people have very strong views, I understand that, and we've got to make sure that we do what we can to deal with those views and to placate those views and to deliver on those views. But we also have to make people very aware, very aware of the consequences of getting it wrong. Now what happened in the United Kingdom was renewables were not able to fill the void and now, as I said, reading The Guardian this morning, they're having to fill the void by opening up formerly closed coal fired power stations.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>What do you want in order to agree to this target? Are you saying that unless we commit to more coal fired power stations, unless we keep the ones that we have open long‑term, you're not going to agree to this? Is that the sum total of what your argument is?</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>No, no, no, not at all. I mean that's a simplistic analogy of something for a rhetorical point.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>No, I'm trying to unpick the riddle.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>It's not unpicking the riddle at all. What I'm saying on that issue is we've got to have a holistic understanding of the experience overseas of what happens if you get this wrong. We have to clearly understand the economics of our nation. We don't make money from pharmaceuticals. We don't make money from selling planes or computers. We don't make money from selling motor cars. We make money, our biggest export earner is the sale of fossil fuels, and for coal, we're selling more at a higher price than before. I imagine that's because Europe is terrified of exactly what happens as they go into a European winter. First and foremost, they need to keep their people employed, keep their people fed and keep their people warm. Any plan we have, it's got to look at the holistic economic, industrial, the capacity of people to be left in the same standard of living as what you had before. That's one of the things I'll be looking at. Of course I'll also be conveying, which is incredibly important, with my colleagues in the party because they may have views, they may have views that are slightly different to my own, but they are certainly entitled to the discussion and that's what we'll be doing as well.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>On the submarine deal that has been announced, the Prime Minister's obviously overseas at the moment, there's a lot of talk of charm offences, we're dispatching military chiefs to calm some of our allies. We can't get a phone call with the French President Emmanuel Macron. One would have thought this could have been done better. Why has Australia bungled this announcement and upset so many friends in doing it?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>Well we haven't bungled the announcement, first and foremost, and with the Prime Minister's lead made sure we can defend our nation with the most competent deterrent, which is this platform. Things have changed in the last short period of time, short years, and we have to change to reflect that. We have to get ourselves, it's not just submarines, the AUKUS arrangement goes across multiple platforms and brings into play a stronger working relationship in the defence of our nation with partners who have the same views as us.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>Sure, but –</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>And the same views as France and the same libertarian, egalitarian, fraternity, the views of France as well. I'm sure that the French, as it sits at the core of what that nation believes in, understands that of course Australia is going to look to the issue of the defence of their people first and foremost. That was an issue and I hope it remains bipartisan with the Labor Party, it's a decision that had to be made.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>Deputy Prime Minister, this should have been a good news story for countries like Indonesia and Malaysia who similarly feel some concern about the rise of China and its increasing military presence in the region, but instead of them seeing this as a positive thing that might lead to benefits for them, they're very upset. Was that really necessary?</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>I know that yes, they do have concerns about exactly where our region, it's no longer Europe, it's not the turmoils of Europe, it's now the issues of our region, and we'll be working incredibly closely with the Indonesians and the Malaysians. Obviously, we see the Quad in work with the Indians and the Japanese and the United States of America again, not to pick a fight. The last thing we want is a war. We want peace. Now that is our primary motivation. To do that you must have the capacity of a formidable deterrent, an interoperability with Australia and the United States and the UK and the closer mechanism is a huge asset to that deterrent. Providing peace and be underpinning peace in our region is the best win for the economies of our region. It is the best win, to be honest, for China. It is the best win that takes us all ahead economically with the incredible economic gains that's been experienced in our region over the last couple of decades, lifting millions, hundreds of millions of people out of poverty. That is success, but it's underpinned by peace, and to have peace, and this has been the issue right back to Roman times, I think about 384 when Vegetius said, you know, si vis pacem para bellum. On the decline of the Roman Empire, he clearly understood that one of the reasons for that was their incapacity to formidably defend themselves.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>All right. I think the conversation's gone a bit further back in history than I'd anticipated, Barnaby Joyce, thank you very much indeed.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>Always a pleasure, Hamish. Good morning listeners.</p> <p class="Colloquy1"><strong>HAMISH MACDONALD: </strong>That's the Deputy Prime Minister there.</p> Joyce Interview with Hamish Macdonald, ABC Radio National Community voices to be heard on Brisbane Airport noise issues https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/community-voices-be-heard-brisbane-airport-noise-issues <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Brisbane residents affected by aircraft noise issues will have their voices heard through an independent community forum established by the Liberal and Nationals Government.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">The forum will operate independently of the review currently being undertaken by Airservices Australia into the operations of the second runway at Brisbane Airport since it opened in mid-2020.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said the Government was aware of community concerns and is committed to addressing them.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“The Government recognises that residents across a number of Brisbane suburbs have been affected by noise issues since the new runway opened,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“We understand the impact this can have on living standards and we want to give those impacted the chance to have their voices heard and issues addressed.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“The independent community forum is separate to the review Airservices is already conducting. Together, these processes will ensure all voices are heard and help inform the steps we take to address the issues.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Federal Member for Brisbane Trevor Evans said establishing the community forum was a welcome step towards addressing the concerns of the Brisbane community.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“This is about empowering residents who have understandably been frustrated by the lack of responsiveness and lack of genuine consideration of their concerns,” Mr Evans said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“That’s why I’ve been calling for the governance arrangements for managing community concerns and complaints about Brisbane Airport to be turned on its head.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“Instead of expecting residents to become aviation experts, this independent community forum puts the onus back on the airport operators and regulators to find solutions that address residents’ legitimate concerns about noise impacts”.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">The Government has appointed Mr Ross Musgrove as the Independent Chair of the forum. Mr Musgrove has extensive experience in serving local communities, most recently as Chief Executive Officer of the Western Downs Regional Council. He will be joined on the forum by:</p> <ul> <li class="BoswellMediaHeader">The Hon Robert Borbidge AO, a former Queensland premier;</li> <li class="BoswellMediaHeader">Ms Claire Moore, a former Senator for Queensland;</li> <li class="BoswellMediaHeader">Mr Nigel Chamier AM, Chair of the Brisbane Airport Community Aviation Consultation Group; and</li> <li class="BoswellMediaHeader">Professor Douglas Baker, School of Architecture and Built Environment at the Queensland University of Technology.</li> </ul> <h2 class="BoswellMediaHeader"><strong>Media Contact:</strong></h2> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader"><strong>Deputy Prime Minister</strong> – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Mr Evans</strong> – Paul Cormack | 0435 820 478 | <a href="mailto:Paul.Cormack@aph.gov.au">Paul.Cormack@aph.gov.au</a></p> Joyce Community voices to be heard on Brisbane Airport noise issues Tenders open for major Newell Highway upgrade https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/buchholz/media-release/tenders-open-major-newell-highway-upgrade <p>Tenders are now being called to engage a head contractor to manage the largest project underway as part of the Newell Highway Upgrade package.</p> <p>The Australian and New South Wales governments are committing more than $257 million towards heavy-duty pavement upgrades along the highway to deliver safer, more reliable journeys between Narrabri and Moree.</p> <p>Four priority sections, totalling a 26.85-kilometre stretch of the Newell Highway, will be upgraded.</p> <p>Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said the Federal Government’s $205.7 million investment will ensure this stretch of road can meet the needs of motorists and freight vehicles, while providing opportunities for local and regional contractors.</p> <p>“This is a major upgrade for the Newell Highway, which connects freight operators and other road users travelling inland between Queensland and Victoria and many regional communities,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p>“The project will reduce travel times, increase freight productivity and improve access along the Newell Highway, as well as to the future Moree Special Activation Precinct and Northern NSW Inland Port at Narrabri.”</p> <p>New South Wales Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Paul Toole said work includes installing a heavy-duty surface suitable for heavy vehicles along the prioritised sections of the highway to boost freight efficiencies and improve connectivity for all road users.</p> <p>“The Newell Highway is the freight backbone of the state, and this latest upgrade builds on our record investment, which also includes rolling out approximately 40 overtaking lanes and opening road train access along the entire length of the highway, to unlock big freight efficiency gains from border to border,” Mr Toole.</p> <p>“Our focus is now on delivering the biggest project under the jointly funded Newell Highway Upgrade package, and today’s release of the tender for the main contract for this project, brings us a step closer to seeing shovels in the ground.”</p> <p>Assistant Minister for Road Safety and Freight Transport Scott Buchholz said the Federal Government was continuing to deliver better regional roads through the $4.9 billion Roads of Strategic Importance initiative.</p> <p>"Nationwide, we are investing in projects like this to help connect regional businesses to local and international markets, and better link up regional communities – to help secure our economic recovery,” Assistant Minister Buchholz said.</p> <p>"This project is about ensuring our key freight roads more efficiently connect agricultural and mining regions to ports, airports and other transport hubs. This will support regional jobs and industries.”</p> <p>Federal Member for Parkes Mark Coulton said the construction work will involve building the new sections of road, as well as five new overtaking lanes, intersection upgrades and multiple new bridge-sized culverts.</p> <p>“This section of the Newell Highway is located within one of the most productive agricultural regions in Australia, so it’s critical that this road is up to scratch to ensure our farmers can more efficiently get their product to market,” Mr Coulton said.</p> <p>“This is an exciting project for the Narrabri and Moree communities and will not only deliver more jobs locally and ensure motorists get home sooner and safer, but will help the region take advantage of the benefits of Inland Rail which is steaming ahead.”</p> <p>Early enabling works started in June last year and included water main relocations at Bellata.</p> <p>Work is planned to commence in early 2022 following the announcement of the successful head contractor for the main construction contract.</p> <p>A mandatory pre-tender meeting for pre-qualified tenderers will be held on Tuesday, 12 October 2021.</p> <p>The community will continue to be kept informed as the project progresses.</p> <p>For more information on the project visit <a href="https://clicktime.symantec.com/3JHGd4VfnFqxzn6aLuip3yn7Vc?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnswroads.work%2Fn2m">https://nswroads.work/n2m</a></p> <p>Tender documents can be downloaded from <a href="https://clicktime.symantec.com/3FdMLQsf7BiH532SVK4BUab7Vc?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tenders.nsw.gov.au%2Frms">https://www.tenders.nsw.gov.au/rms</a></p> <p>The Australian and NSW governments have together committed almost $740 million towards the upgrade of the Newell Highway, as part of the Newell Highway Upgrade package. This complements a further $375 million in funding committed to upgrading this important corridor under the Roads of Strategic Importance initiative.</p> <h2><strong>Media contact:</strong></h2> <p>Deputy Prime Minister – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> <p>Minister Toole – Ella Smith | 0428 745 348 | <a href="mailto:Ella.Smith@minister.nsw.gov.au">Ella.Smith@minister.nsw.gov.au</a></p> <p>Mr Coulton – Sophie Harris | 0491 135 852 | <a href="mailto:Sophie.Harris@aph.gov.au">Sophie.Harris@aph.gov.au</a></p> Buchholz Tenders open for major Newell Highway upgrade New North Esk River pedestrian and cycle bridge officially open https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/fletcher/media-release/new-north-esk-river-pedestrian-and-cycle-bridge-officially-open <p>The development of the University of Tasmania’s new Inveresk campus has reached an important milestone with the official opening of the North Esk River pedestrian and cycle bridge.</p> <p>The new $5 million North Esk River pedestrian and cycle bridge is a key community asset that provides a vital link between the Inveresk precinct and the Launceston CBD.</p> <p>The bridge is part of the first stage of construction of the $283.4 million redevelopment of the University of Tasmania – a major initiative under the $536 million Launceston City Deal.</p> <p>The staged approach to the development of the Inveresk campus is allowing for more ongoing work for apprentices and other employees, maximising the benefits to local Launceston companies and businesses.</p> <p>Local specialists BridgePro Engineering were engaged to build the bridge and construction started in March 2020. The structural steel components of the bridge were built by Haywards, another local company.</p> <p>The redevelopment of the University of Tasmania in Launceston includes relocating the Launceston campus to Inveresk, strengthening the future of the Australian Maritime College, establishing Launceston as the home of the Tasmanian Institute of Agriculture, and establishing the Defence and Maritime Innovation and Design Precinct at Newnham.</p> <p>The project is funded under the Launceston City Deal, with the Commonwealth contributing $130 million, the Tasmanian Government contributing $60 million, the local government contributing $5.4 million, and the University of Tasmania contributing $88 million.</p> <p>More information on the Launceston City Deal is available at:<br /> <a href="www.infrastructure.gov.au/territories-regions-cities/cities/city-deals/launceston">www.infrastructure.gov.au/territories-regions-cities/cities/city-deals/launceston</a>.</p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to Federal Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP:</strong></p> <p>“The opening the North Esk River pedestrian and cycle bridge today is a key milestone in the development of the University of Tasmania’s Inveresk campus – one of the largest infrastructure projects undertaken in Launceston.</p> <p>“The new campus, which is a key project within the $536 million Launceston City Deal, will help increase the vibrancy of the Launceston CBD by creating a new student population, fostering research and innovation, and supporting local jobs.”</p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to Tasmanian Minister for State Growth, the Hon Roger Jaensch MP:</strong></p> <p>“This new community asset providing access to University of Tasmania’s Launceston campus and surrounding precinct will further enhance our university’s appeal to more tertiary students.</p> <p>The pedestrian and cycle bridge will connect two locations at the heart of Launceston and is a true demonstration of how the City Deal brings partners and local industry together for greater city outcomes</p> <p>This is another important initiative being delivered as part of our City Deal that will transform Launceston into one of the most liveable and innovative regional cities.”</p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to Federal Member for Bass, Bridget Archer MP:</strong></p> <p>“The bridge is a critical piece of infrastructure connecting the new Inveresk campus to our vibrant and bustling CBD.</p> <p>“I look forward to seeing more projects delivered through the University of Tasmania redevelopment and seeing the many positive outcomes that will benefit the Launceston community and surrounding region.”</p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to the Mayor for the City of Launceston, Albert van Zetten:</strong></p> <p>“This is an excellent example of how three levels of government can successfully come together and work towards a common goal, with the Launceston City Deal continuing to promote new opportunities for growth and development.</p> <p>“It is encouraging to see opportunities available for local industries and businesses to take on the projects and grow, supporting local jobs.”</p> Fletcher New North Esk River pedestrian and cycle bridge officially open Green light for new CDU precinct https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/littleproud/media-release/green-light-new-cdu-precinct <p>A $151.5 million federal loan to fund the construction of Charles Darwin University’s (CDU) new Education and Community Precinct has been finalised, paving the way for major construction to start.</p> <p>Delivered under the Australian Government’s Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility (NAIF), the funding will help make the new $250 million precinct a reality sooner for Darwin.</p> <p>The loan funding is in addition to the $97.3 million commitment by the Government towards the project, which has already secured the development approvals needed for construction to start, meaning shovels can hit dirt on the project this year.</p> <p>Minister for Northern Australia David Littleproud said this project will proceed with thanks to the NAIF loan.</p> <p>“Now there will be jobs coming to Darwin with all the follow on to local economy,” Minister Littleproud said.</p> <p>“At the end of the day, there will be a first-class education facility that will attract the best and brightest, for research and development for business and industry in Darwin.</p> <p>“This is exactly the type of transformational project the NAIF is backing right across the north, with $3.1 billion already committed to 26 projects.</p> <p>“Not only will these projects increase local amenity and opportunities for communities, they are expected to inject $15 billion into the economy and create more than 10,000 construction and ongoing jobs – providing a boost to northern Australia and its economy.”</p> <p>Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts Paul Fletcher said the new precinct is a significant infrastructure project that will help create jobs and support local businesses.</p> <p>“The new CDU precinct is the centrepiece of the Darwin City Deal, which is helping to position Darwin as a vibrant and liveable tropical city with a strong and diversified economy,” Minister Fletcher said.</p> <p>“This precinct will deliver state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities, an art gallery and library that will transform the Territory’s education sector and open up opportunities for the broader community.”</p> <p>Senator for the Northern Territory Dr Sam McMahon said the precinct will be a lasting legacy that brings in more students and professionals while encouraging new investments, local business and more activity in the Territory’s capital.</p> <p>“I look forward to seeing shovels hit the ground in the coming months, with construction expected to create 730 much-needed jobs and the project to inject $600 million back into the Territory economy,” Dr McMahon said.</p> <p>Special Envoy for Northern Australia Senator Susan McDonald said the NAIF loan is another milestone for northern Australia development.</p> <p>“CDU is helping to grow our own talent and drive a stronger, more diversified northern Australia economy,” Senator McDonald.</p> <p>Construction is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2024, with CDU able to draw on the loan funds to support construction milestones.</p> <p>The final design of the Education and Community Precinct was released late August 2021, and can be viewed at: educationcommunityprecinct.cdu.edu.au.</p> <h2>Media Contact:</h2> <p>Douglas Ferguson 0455 448 985 (Minister Littleproud)</p> <p>Imre Salusinszky 0432 535 737 (Minister Fletcher)</p> <p>Lance Northey 0411 876 162 (Senator McMahon)</p> <p>Julian Tomlinson 0421 059 187 (Senator McDonald)</p> Littleproud Green light for new CDU precinct Four more commuter car parks to be delivered along Melbourne’s Northern Lines https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/fletcher/media-release/four-more-commuter-car-parks-be-delivered-along-melbournes-northern-lines <p>Sites for four additional commuter car parks along Melbourne’s northern rail lines have been agreed to as part of a joint commitment from the Commonwealth and Victorian Government to improve public transport access and ease road congestion.</p> <p>This gives effect to a commitment made by the Morrison Government at the 2019 election that it would provide funding of $70 million, on a matching basis with the Victorian Government, to deliver commuter car parks at a number of train stations on Melbourne’s northern rail lines.  </p> <p>With all locations now having been determined, the outcome of this commitment will be that seven commuter car parks are delivered, at Craigieburn, Hurstbridge, Epping, Merlynston, Sunbury, Watergardens and Greensborough. Across these locations, the total number of parking spaces following completion of all of the projects will be more than 4,500.</p> <p>The $140 million package of works is being funded by the Morrison Government and the Victorian Government on a 50:50 basis.</p> <p>Construction on the Hurstbridge, Craigieburn and Epping commuter car parks has already been completed. Construction on Merlynston and Watergardens is expected to commence before the end of 2021 and construction on Greensborough and Sunbury is expected to commence in 2022. </p> <p>The Morrison Government is committed to delivering commuter car parks at multiple train stations across Melbourne, to get more people out of their cars and onto trains, improving congestion and safety on local roads.</p> <p>Under the Urban Congestion Fund, we are delivering 182 packages of work nationwide, with 73 of these projects now complete or underway, and a further 30 expected to start construction before the end of this year. </p> <p>Projects under the Urban Congestion Fund form part of the Morrison Government’s record $110 billion, ten year infrastructure investment pipeline, which is helping to drive Australia’s economic recovery.</p> <p>Further information can be found at <a href="https://investment.infrastructure.gov.au/">investment.infrastructure.gov.au</a> and <a href="https://carparks.vic.gov.au/?utm_source=miragenews&amp;utm_medium=miragenews&amp;utm_campaign=news">carparks.vic.gov.au</a>.</p> Fletcher Four more commuter car parks to be delivered along Melbourne’s Northern Lines Interview with Leigh Sales, ABC 7.30 https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/interview/interview-leigh-sales-abc-730 <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> Protesters have gathered for the third day in a row in Melbourne, this time targeting vaccination and community health clinics. Ninety-two people were arrested but the rally was smaller than the previous one. Earlier, I spoke to the Nationals’ leader and acting Prime Minister, Barnaby Joyce. Barnaby Joyce, thank you for your time. You’re one of the most prominent right-wing politicians in the country. Are you prepared to show leadership and call out and condemn the violent nationalists, racists, anti-vaxxers and far-right extremists who've been part of the protests in Melbourne this week?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Yeah, absolutely, especially in their actions around the Shrine of Remembrance. It's not about being left or right, it's about doing the proper thing. This is sacred ground, as noted by Sir John Monash, and to have people lounging around there no matter what they think their issue is, swearing, littering, drinking, this is to represent tens of thousands of Australians. I've been vaccinated twice and if you're not doing it for yourself, if you've got a view to it, then do it for the person sitting next to you. But there is some logic behind this, this pandemic will break out into a smaller form once we open the doors and the doors have to be opened again. We have to be able to have as small a group as possible who need the intensive care units that will obviously be filled by people who have not been vaccinated. That's just a fact of epidemiology, that is going to happen and people protesting to make it worse is not a logical thing. I understand the frustrations, we've all got those frustrations. We want this over. The best way to get back to normal life as quickly as possible is get vaccinated as quickly as possible.</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> ASIO says that 40 per cent now of its domestic terrorism investigations involve nationalists and racist extremists. How important do you think firm leadership is in denouncing those ideologies to prevent the rise of them in Australia?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> I come from a family where they served to fight against fascism. I was brought up very much educated about the evils of the far right. And what-</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> And are you concerned about the rise of it in Australia? Do you think it is a problem here in Australia?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> I believe temperance is an incredibly important thing in everything you do, that the human condition is crushed by the evils of the far right and crushed by the evils on the far left. And they're both extremism. It's a horse shoe with the crazy left and the crazy right on a bent horse shoe are really not that far away from one another.</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> What do you think of colleagues such as George Christensen cheering on the freedom protesters in Melbourne?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> I don't believe he was cheering them on, but any sort of any sense of support for people who are breaking the law, who are assaulting police officers, who are desecrating war memorials, is something that's abhorrent to me. That is my view and George knows my view. What your next question is I can predict is, well, why don't you stop him? I can talk to him and that's a logical thing to do. But if you said, you know, go up to Dawson and tackle him in the street on and tie him up, it's just illogical. One of the things we love about this nation is you have the freedom to say what you like, even if what you say is wrong. That's one of the things we protect in this nation and it's up to the discernment of the fourth estate, yourself, of other people to say they disagree with it and most importantly, the logic of every person watching your show to say that is your view, but it's a view I don't agree with.</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> On another subject, climate change, the Glasgow meeting's drawing closer. If the Prime Minister proposes that Australia go to Glasgow with a commitment to net zero by 2050, will the National Party sign up to that?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> When you say sign up, sign up to what? We'll look at that issue in a collegiate with my party –</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> I just mean sign up exactly to that – net zero by 2050.</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> We acknowledge the caution that we have to have. We have to have a form of caution that understands that right now, in England, this year six-fold increase in gas prices. Since the start of the year, 250 per cent. I think last night, 800,000 households have to find a new energy provider. This is what happens if you get the mix wrong. It's putting pressure on their capacity during winter to keep themselves warm. Now I realise that this is because they are coming out of COVID, but also it's the incapacity of renewables to fill the void.</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> Your predecessor, Michael McCormack, said this week that if Australia doesn't sign up to net zero, it could threaten Australia's trade relationships and export income.</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> These things are all things that have to be taken into account and we must make sure that we understand the circumstances overseas, we understand the circumstances of what's happening in our nation here.</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> Can I ask, where are negotiations up to between the National Party and the Minister for Emissions Reduction, Angus Taylor?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> You can ask, but I can't answer, because otherwise you're having a sort of general discussion, I'm –</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> Do you think you're near the end? Got a long way to go? Or?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>I don't deliberate on the 7.30 Report, as much as I respect you as a reporter. That's not the way we're going to do business. And I have to respect the Party room I'm a part of and have the great honour of leading and give them the capacity to also have their views and their views are as far and as wide ranging as yours and mine.</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> Before we run out of time, New South Wales and Victoria will be coming out of COVID restrictions shortly. As a regional politician, can I ask are regional hospitals sufficiently resourced to deal with the inevitable increase in admissions they'll be seeing?</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> There are concerns. I've been speaking to people of Urbenville just this afternoon. And in Urbenville, they're saying, "the issue we have is we're serviced from Queensland". And the top of my electorate is higher, is further north, or about the same latitude north, as Warwick. And they're saying, "Well this is, this creates confusions". And they're unnecessary confusions and they're things we have to manage. But at this point in time, we're doing a good job. About three-quarters of Australia has been vaccinated once, about half of Australia has been vaccinated twice. In Aboriginal Australia, we call them Aboriginals in my part of the world, we've got a lot more work to do in that community and we have to bring that issue forward. We've been very lucky and blessed there have been very few deaths from COVID in the Aboriginal community. We're very mindful of this and the work of the flying doctors are doing. We've got millions of vaccines turning up now. I believe around the end of October, you'll have far more vaccines than people wanting to get vaccinated. Let's hope we cap out over 80 per cent. but that's up to your listeners and your viewers.</p> <p><strong>LEIGH SALES:</strong> Barnaby Joyce, thank you.</p> <p><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Thank you very much, Leigh.</p> Joyce Interview with Leigh Sales, ABC 7.30 RFS solitary brigade moves into new and improved shed https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/rfs-solitary-brigade-moves-new-and-improved-shed <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">The Rural Fire Service (RFS) Solitary Brigade has moved into its new and improved home, marking a major milestone in the delivery of the Coffs Harbour bypass project.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">As part of early works, the RFS shed has been relocated to make way for the major infrastructure project.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said building a new home for the RFS was a very important component of this economy-boosting project.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“The local Rural Fire Service provides an invaluable service and this new facility will ensure they can continue to perform their important work in the community,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“This is a significant milestone in a project that will change this region forever. The Coffs Harbour bypass project is part of our record $110 billion infrastructure investment plan in action, helping to connect communities and improve safety, while creating jobs and supporting our economic recovery.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“It is another example of the Australian Government’s determination to deliver for the people of this region, to make sure the infrastructure they need and deserve is funded and delivered.”</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Federal Member for Cowper Pat Conaghan said the $700,000 facility built by local firm C-Build was part of the Australian and New South Wales governments’ commitment to ensuring the local economy benefits from the Coffs Harbour bypass.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“Building the new Solitary RFS shed was a top priority to ensure an uninterrupted fire service for the community, after the land the old facility was on was acquired as part of construction,” Mr Conaghan said.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“The new shed is double the size of the previous one and is located on Bruxner Park Road, closer to the new highway and right next to the proposed Korora Hill interchange, meaning better and faster access for emergency response.”</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">State Member for Coffs Harbour Gurmesh Singh said the new location means the RFS will have easier access to the highway and surrounding area, dedicated site parking and outdoor training areas.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“The building design also allows the brigade to house larger fire trucks and comes with a dedicated amenities and training room so the volunteers can enjoy more comfortable and productive down time, while the fit out includes additional change rooms and bathrooms,” Mr Singh said.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“This is a big win for the Coffs Harbour community and it’s great to see early works on the construction of the bypass are progressing extremely well.”</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">New South Wales RFS Superintendent Sean McArdle said the team was grateful to Transport for NSW for delivering a new state of the art station for the Solitary Brigade.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“Transport for NSW is to be congratulated for their open and ongoing engagement with both the RFS District Office and the Solitary Brigade members,” Superintendent McArdle said.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">“This station is ideally placed to ensure the Brigade has good access both north and south and the station and amenities will serve the Brigade and local communities for many years into the future.”</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">More information about the Coffs Harbour Bypass: <a href="http://www.pacifichighway.nsw.gov.au/coffsharbourbypass">www.pacifichighway.nsw.gov.au/coffsharbourbypass</a>.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Information is also available from the Community Display Office located at 54 Moonee Street, Coffs Harbour.</p> <h2 class="BoswellMediaHeader"><strong>Media contact:</strong></h2> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Deputy Prime Minister – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Pat Conaghan – Amanda Donald  | 0418 928 744 | <a href="mailto:Amanda.Donald@aph.gov">Amanda.Donald@aph.gov</a></p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Gurmesh Singh – Craig McTear | 6652 6500 | <a href="mailto:Craig.McTear@parliament.nsw.gov.au">Craig.McTear@parliament.nsw.gov.au</a></p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader"> </p> Joyce RFS solitary brigade moves into new and improved shed Green light for new CDU precinct https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/fletcher/media-release/green-light-new-cdu-precinct <p>A $151.5 million federal loan to fund the construction of Charles Darwin University’s (CDU) new Education and Community Precinct has been finalised, paving the way for major construction to start.</p> <p>Delivered under the Australian Government’s Northern Australia Infrastructure Facility (NAIF), the funding will help make the new $250 million precinct a reality sooner for Darwin.</p> <p>The loan funding is in addition to the $97.3 million commitment by the Government towards the project, which has already secured the development approvals needed for construction to start, meaning shovels can hit dirt on the project this year.</p> <p>Minister for Northern Australia David Littleproud said this project will proceed with thanks to the NAIF loan.</p> <p>“Now there will be jobs coming to Darwin with all the follow on to local economy,” Minister Littleproud said.</p> <p>“At the end of the day, there will be a first-class education facility that will attract the best and brightest, for research and development for business and industry in Darwin.</p> <p>“This is exactly the type of transformational project the NAIF is backing right across the north, with $3.1 billion already committed to 26 projects.</p> <p>“Not only will these projects increase local amenity and opportunities for communities, they are expected to inject $15 billion into the economy and create more than 10,000 construction and ongoing jobs – providing a boost to northern Australia and its economy.”</p> <p>Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts Paul Fletcher said the new precinct is a significant infrastructure project that will help create jobs and support local businesses.</p> <p>“The new CDU precinct is the centrepiece of the Darwin City Deal, which is helping to position Darwin as a vibrant and liveable tropical city with a strong and diversified economy,” Minister Fletcher said.</p> <p>“This precinct will deliver state-of-the-art teaching and research facilities, an art gallery and library that will transform the Territory’s education sector and open up opportunities for the broader community.”</p> <p>Senator for the Northern Territory Dr Sam McMahon said the precinct will be a lasting legacy that brings in more students and professionals while encouraging new investments, local business and more activity in the Territory’s capital.</p> <p>“I look forward to seeing shovels hit the ground in the coming months, with construction expected to create 730 much-needed jobs and the project to inject $600 million back into the Territory economy,” Dr McMahon said.</p> <p>Special Envoy for Northern Australia Senator Susan McDonald said the NAIF loan is another milestone for northern Australia development.</p> <p>“CDU is helping to grow our own talent and drive a stronger, more diversified northern Australia economy,” Senator McDonald.</p> <p>Construction is expected to be completed in the first quarter of 2024, with CDU able to draw on the loan funds to support construction milestones.</p> <p>The final design of the Education and Community Precinct was released late August 2021, and can be viewed at: educationcommunityprecinct.cdu.edu.au.</p> <h2>Media Contact:</h2> <p>Douglas Ferguson 0455 448 985 (Minister Littleproud)</p> <p>Imre Salusinszky 0432 535 737 (Minister Fletcher)</p> <p>Lance Northey 0411 876 162 (Senator McMahon)</p> <p>Julian Tomlinson 0421 059 187 (Senator McDonald)</p> Fletcher Green light for new CDU precinct Tenders open for major Newell Highway upgrade https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/tenders-open-major-newell-highway-upgrade <p class="x">Tenders are now being called to engage a head contractor to manage the largest project underway as part of the Newell Highway Upgrade package.</p> <p class="x">The Australian and New South Wales governments are committing more than $257 million towards heavy-duty pavement upgrades along the highway to deliver safer, more reliable journeys between Narrabri and Moree.</p> <p class="x">Four priority sections, totalling a 26.85-kilometre stretch of the Newell Highway, will be upgraded.</p> <p>Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said the Federal Government’s $205.7 million investment will ensure this stretch of road can meet the needs of motorists and freight vehicles, while providing opportunities for local and regional contractors.</p> <p class="x">“This is a major upgrade for the Newell Highway, which connects freight operators and other road users travelling inland between Queensland and Victoria and many regional communities,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p class="x">“The project will reduce travel times, increase freight productivity and improve access along the Newell Highway, as well as to the future Moree Special Activation Precinct and Northern NSW Inland Port at Narrabri.”</p> <p class="x">New South Wales Minister for Regional Transport and Roads Paul Toole said work includes installing a heavy-duty surface suitable for heavy vehicles along the prioritised sections of the highway to boost freight efficiencies and improve connectivity for all road users.</p> <p>“The Newell Highway is the freight backbone of the state, and this latest upgrade builds on our record investment, which also includes rolling out approximately 40 overtaking lanes and opening road train access along the entire length of the highway, to unlock big freight efficiency gains from border to border,” Mr Toole.</p> <p class="x">“Our focus is now on delivering the biggest project under the jointly funded Newell Highway Upgrade package, and today’s release of the tender for the main contract for this project, brings us a step closer to seeing shovels in the ground.”</p> <p class="x">Assistant Minister for Road Safety and Freight Transport Scott Buchholz said the Federal Government was continuing to deliver better regional roads through the $4.9 billion Roads of Strategic Importance initiative.</p> <p>"Nationwide, we are investing in projects like this to help connect regional businesses to local and international markets, and better link up regional communities – to help secure our economic recovery,” Assistant Minister Buchholz said.</p> <p>"This project is about ensuring our key freight roads more efficiently connect agricultural and mining regions to ports, airports and other transport hubs. This will support regional jobs and industries.”</p> <p class="x">Federal Member for Parkes Mark Coulton said the construction work will involve building the new sections of road, as well as five new overtaking lanes, intersection upgrades and multiple new bridge-sized culverts.</p> <p class="x">“This section of the Newell Highway is located within one of the most productive agricultural regions in Australia, so it’s critical that this road is up to scratch to ensure our farmers can more efficiently get their product to market,” Mr Coulton said.</p> <p class="x">“This is an exciting project for the Narrabri and Moree communities and will not only deliver more jobs locally and ensure motorists get home sooner and safer, but will help the region take advantage of the benefits of Inland Rail which is steaming ahead.”</p> <p class="x">Early enabling works started in June last year and included water main relocations at Bellata.</p> <p class="x">Work is planned to commence in early 2022 following the announcement of the successful head contractor for the main construction contract.</p> <p class="x">A mandatory pre-tender meeting for pre-qualified tenderers will be held on Tuesday, 12 October 2021.</p> <p class="x">The community will continue to be kept informed as the project progresses.</p> <p class="x">For more information on the project visit <a href="https://clicktime.symantec.com/3JHGd4VfnFqxzn6aLuip3yn7Vc?u=https%3A%2F%2Fnswroads.work%2Fn2m">https://nswroads.work/n2m</a></p> <p class="x">Tender documents can be downloaded from <a href="https://clicktime.symantec.com/3FdMLQsf7BiH532SVK4BUab7Vc?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tenders.nsw.gov.au%2Frms">https://www.tenders.nsw.gov.au/rms</a></p> <p class="x">The Australian and NSW governments have together committed almost $740 million towards the upgrade of the Newell Highway, as part of the Newell Highway Upgrade package. This complements a further $375 million in funding committed to upgrading this important corridor under the Roads of Strategic Importance initiative.</p> <h2 class="BoswellMediaHeader"><strong>Media contact:</strong></h2> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Deputy Prime Minister – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Minister Toole – Ella Smith | 0428 745 348 | <a href="mailto:Ella.Smith@minister.nsw.gov.au">Ella.Smith@minister.nsw.gov.au</a></p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Mr Coulton – Sophie Harris | 0491 135 852 | <a href="mailto:Sophie.Harris@aph.gov.au">Sophie.Harris@aph.gov.au</a></p> <p> </p> Joyce Tenders open for major Newell Highway upgrade Doorstop – Tamworth https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/interview/doorstop-tamworth <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>Today Mr Bowen, who used to be a former Treasurer of Australia, said that my reference to a gas crisis in the UK was fearmongering. Well, Mr Bowen, this is not fearmongering, this is the price and it’s happening right now. And Mr Bowen this is why we have to be very careful in our [indistinct] that we don’t get it wrong, otherwise that won’t be the UK’s gas crisis, that won’t be UK’s energy crisis, that will be Australia’s energy crisis. And, now, the reason they’re doing that, Mr Bowen, is because renewables were not able to fill the void left by the removal of other power providers such as coal.</p> <p class="Default">So, Mr Bowen, what they’re doing is they’re firing up old coal-fired power plants and it’s costing an absolute bucket. Planning has to be part of this. That is not just the case for Europe, that will be the case for Australia if we get it wrong. We’re not making that up, that’s happening in Europe right now. We mightn’t be talking about it in Australia. Mr Bowen, you’re probably not aware of it in your job, but it is something that the Coalition and the Nationals want to make sure doesn’t happen to our country.</p> <p class="Default">In the same path, Mr Bowen, we want to make sure that we keep people in Central Queensland in a job. It’s very important to those in the blue-collar jobs in Central Queensland that they’re able to pay for their house, pay for their car, keep themselves in the life that they’ve worked very hard for. The same, Mr Bowen, as would be happening in the Hunter Valley.</p> <p class="Default">Now, if you’re not going to do it in the Labor Party, if the Labor Party has moved on from them, if the Labor Party does not have the political smarts to even know exactly what’s going on in the globe right now, then of course we have to do it for you and make you aware of it and then maybe you can come back and respond to it. Maybe, Mr Bowen, you’ll say that that was all just scaremongering and mythology and it’s not really happening and there’s no gas crisis in the UK and The Guardian got it wrong and the BBC have got it wrong and The Financial Times have got it wrong and Mr Bowen has got it right. But I doubt it. Questions?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Wouldn’t it be wise to invest in renewables in order to avoid ending up in that situation like the UK?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Well, the UK did invest in renewables and we’re investing in renewables. But you can’t just have sort of an arbitrary – so the Labor Party said no matter what they’re just locked in. They’re going to legislate towards 2050 and so what they’re saying is they’ll lock you into that crisis. They’ll lock you into that crisis because they haven’t actually showed us in their plan of exactly how they’re going to do it.</p> <p class="Default">But when you don’t plan, crisis is what you get. And that’s what we get with the Labor Party. The Labor Party basically are a party that it’s all about the vim of the day. It’s not about the experience of being in business, and when they want to dispense with something they say, “Oh, you’re fear mongering” But what we are is cautious, making sure we go about things in a prudent way, making sure we clearly inform people of the risks and making sure we keep people in a job.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> So do you support a net-zero emissions target by 2050?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> What we do is we make sure that we understand all the issues that are pertinent to it. We make sure that we avoid things such as the UK-European gas crisis. We make sure we keep people in a job because, as The Guardian says, what the UK has now is, and I quote, chaos.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> So would you support the target?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> I’ve got to be really careful that we don’t have the 1.5 million people in the UK who recently have lost their provider. I’m not going to support a process that leads to 850,000 people two nights ago losing their energy provider. I’m not going to support a process that in the last year has brought about the collapse of 13 energy providers in the UK. This is something that we have to make sure we manage.</p> <p class="Default">Now, when people say do you support it and they don’t tell you how they’re going to do it, they’re opening themselves wide open to a crisis like they’re experiencing in Europe, like they’re experiencing in the UK. And I believe that’s a discussion and that’s something the Australian people have to be aware of. Because that’s how you prudently examine an issue rather than this sort of rhetorical one -line flourish that seems to be the remit of the Labor Party and Mr Bowen.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> So Australia has the world’s highest gas prices more or less, eastern Australia does, despite being the world’s biggest gas exporter. What are you going to do to solve that problem?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Well, Australia’s making a lot of money out of other people’s stupidity, and that’s why the gas price is so high. Australia’s making money and we’re managing to pay for the services that are incredibly important. I tell you who else is making money out of other people’s stupidity and the fact that they haven’t clearly had a proper plan to plumb things up and be able to provide the alternate power is Gazprom, which is the Russian provider of gas.</p> <p class="Default">Now we want to make sure – and the Coalition is a prudent organisation – and we want to make sure that any process forward doesn’t just follow rhetorical flourish, one-line headlines but makes sure that we have a clear plan because I have to show the Australian people what happens, what it looks like, when you get it wrong. The UK energy crisis, the European energy crisis, will be our energy crisis and at the end of that graph resides coldness and unemployment, and we don’t want either of those.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> So the state government is looking at a gas future policy that only a couple of months ago they announced that it includes potentially development in the Liverpool Plains, among other places, in your electorate. You haven’t supported coal in Liverpool Plains?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> That’s correct.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Is that – I mean, would you be in favour of gas?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Well, Matt, look at the pressure that’s going to come on it because of this. Look at the pressure, the money that can be made and the commercial pressure that’s going to come on for the development of further gas fields. This is part of the process. This is why you’ve got to prudently look at it. And, no, I don’t support the destruction of aquifers, and I don’t support things on prime agricultural land. But if you were going to move away, all the way from the coal-fired power stations, you’re going to have to find another form of base load. Now, we’re building Snowy Hydro 2.0, but that in itself – you’ve got environmental studies, geotech studies, and that in itself is incredibly expensive to get that capacity for deliverable power. And so everyone says, “Oh, well, the way we’ll do it is with gas.” Well, if you’re going to do it with gas you’re going to have to find new gas reserves and you’re going to have to tap those gas reserves and utilise those gas reserves.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Obviously there are gas reserves here and there are – you know, potentially they could be developed, exploited. Would you be supportive of that?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Well, I am certainly very supportive of opening up new gas reserves in Australia, but not in the middle of the Breeza Plains, quite obviously.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Josh Frydenberg has said that borrowing costs for governments, businesses and households could increase if international finance markets think Australia isn’t doing enough on climate change. Is this a good reason to take a stronger action on climate change?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> And the Treasurer’s completely right. People make decisions that restrict the flow of capital. But part of our sovereignty should be [indistinct] restrict the capacity of Australia to act within rules and within the process that is legitimate. Remember, the people who are the head of banks or the head of superannuation funds, they don’t actually own the money. They only administer the money. The reason they have the job is they presented very well at an interview. Yet sometimes these people talk as if it was their money, and it’s not their money. Australia has to be absolutely certain that our future and our prosperity is not determined by a third party who presented very well at an interview and then is making a determination that affects our whole economic future.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> But you have said that you would agree to a plan to zero emissions to 2050 so long as regional areas weren’t hurt. What do you mean by that, and what do the Nationals want?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> We want to make sure, first and foremost, that the crisis we just showed you with, what’s happening in the UK and what’s happening in Europe does not happen in Australia. We want to make sure that people in Muswellbrook, in Gladstone, in Townsville, in Emerald, in Singleton, we want to make sure that they keep their job and their standard of living – not just any job, a job that maintains the income that they’re concerning at the current time. We want to make sure that the shops that these people spend their money in are not sent out the back door because we completely turn their economies upside down.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Is there no way to plan to make sure that renewable industries can be built in certain places?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> I’ve got no problems with sections of renewables, we support sections of renewables. We want to make sure that we don’t get stuck in a crisis lock you’re seeing in Europe and the UK. We want to make sure that we’re diligent. We want to make sure that we’re prudent. We want to make sure that anything that we suggest to the Australian people we back up with a sober view of how our economy goes. Remember, the largest export in our economy is fossil fuels. Second biggest is iron ore. If you take away the biggest export, the biggest income earner for your household, then the only thing that’s going to happen to that household is it’s going to have a lower standard of living unless you can, not at some wish in the future, but right at the same time as one is transitioning out, transition into another export that earns just as much money as the income earner for the Australian household that we lost. So that is something unless you can do it, you’ve got to protect the economy of this nation.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> So for months the Prime Minister and now Josh Frydenberg have been sort of signalling moving in the direction of net zero by 2050 – sorry – commitment, and you’ve been signalling an opposition to that. When is this going to come to a head? How is it going to be negotiated as an agreement?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> As always, we are in discussions. Of course we are always in discussions. But our discussions are going to be one of prudence. They’re going to be one of that is based on making sure that we keep harm away from the Australian economy and from Australian jobs and from the shops that need the money that comes from an economy that works because we don’t want to be quoted in The Guardian in the future as the chaos of the Australian energy market, as is happening in Europe, by reason of us following a Labor Party plan which is blindness. A statement they’re going to arrive at a position without actually ever telling us how they’re going to get there. And when we talk about a crisis that is so apparent leading the news in places such as England, they call it scaremongering. Why? Because they don’t even know it exists.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST: </strong>What about Australia’s international reputation? Do we think that internal political negotiations over the targets are affecting this?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Australia is such an honourable country, we make agreement and we stick to them. Other countries around the world make agreements and forget all about them. We want to make sure that any agreement we make we stick to, that any promise we make we keep, as we do. Because Australia has made commitments and promises and not only have we kept them, we’ve exceeded them. So the difference with Australia is we earnestly stand behind our statements.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Except on the submarines.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> I can take that one up. With the submarines, that was a contractual process. In that contractual process were a whole range of steps and gateways that said if this is not happening on time, on budget, that we have rights, because that is a contract. That’s how contracts work. And they work whether you’re constructing submarines or constructing a house. There are responsibilities, there are time lines, there are gateways that have to be met. It’s the right of any contractual party in contractual negotiations to say, “Well, this is not working,” and also, very importantly, the circumstances that Australia now finds itself in are entirely different. Our greatest contract is to the Australian people and to keep them safe, to keep them secure and give them a deterrent because it’s not just the submarines, it’s also our new stronger relationship with the United Kingdom and the United States so that our children, our grandchildren can be safe, secure and have the liberties and freedoms that we just take as a birth right.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> So in terms of the contract, you said that the contract was either out of time or was over budget. Did the French know that it was –</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Those issues were brought up directly with the President of France in one-on-one discussions with the Prime Minister of Australia. He clearly brought to their attention the concerns Australia had about how the contract was going. Without a shadow of a doubt.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Okay. And in terms of those submarines, British and American SSN nuclear –</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Yeah.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> You know what I’m talking about.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Yeah.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Those submarines, they sail around the ocean, often on nuclear – essentially nuclear war tasking, so following missile – you know, missile-armed submarines from Russia or China. Are Australian submarines going to do the same thing?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Australian submarines will not have nuclear weapons.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> No, but will they be following British – will they be following Chinese and Russian submarines that do?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> There’s things about that: (a), number one, I don’t know. And, number two, if I did know, there’s no way I’d sit on a press conference here in Tamworth and just go, “Oh, now, keep this to yourself, fellas, but”.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Sure, fair enough. Can I ask you about another thing? Is that all right?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>SPEAKER:</strong> Yeah, probably one more.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> How did last night go, the –</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Yeah, 270 people we had online for the town hall, tele town hall, and we had hundreds more who were listening but not actually participating in it. So it’s really essential in a time of Covid to make sure we give people a venue to ask questions, hear what we say and we hope that the questions that are asked are probably in the same format as what a lot of other questions that are provided to us are. We did it in the north of the electorate. We’re trying to show people we’re getting around, but we’re trying to open it so that as many people as possible have the capacity to talk to us. And they understand the restrictions that so many of us are under.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> Sure. What were the big issues that were brought up?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> A lot of the issues is about obviously Covid. Covid is a huge one and how we deal with that. There were some questions about telecommunications as well and obviously also questions to do with also defence, submarines. I’d say the biggest issue is Covid and the economic effects of Covid. Today at a small business forum in Armidale, once more, it was about how we get the economy moving because they want to make a buck again. They appreciate government support. In some instances they want more, but they understand that there’s a limit to that. And the only solution to this in the long term is to get the economy working again and we get the economy working again by opening it up again and we open it up again by people getting inoculated twice. We hope that around about the end of October we’re going to have more vaccine doses, vastly more than people who want to get vaccinated, and then we’re in a position to say, “Okay, from now on the risk is yours because we’re opening the economy up and we’re moving on.” Because each one of those shops, that’s precisely what they need.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>JOURNALIST:</strong> And will you do another one or another part of the electorate –</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> I’ve done one before and so that was not the first. And I look forward to doing more. And, you know, obviously one-on-one meetings in person is the best outcome. That’s what we did in Armidale. But if you can’t do that then tele town halls are – how do you speak to hundreds of people in one venue through a phone? Okay, done? Thanks guys.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">ENDS</p> Joyce Doorstop – Tamworth Interview with Peter Stefanovic, First Edition, Sky News https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/interview/interview-peter-stefanovic-first-edition-sky-news <p class="Default"><strong>PETER STEVANOVIC: </strong>Let’s bring in the Acting Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce. I’m going to send a couple of topics over your way, Barnaby Joyce. Good to see you, by the way. Thanks for your time. So I do want to start off with the protests in the last couple of days in Melbourne, and the Prime Minister was also just asked about this, too. But I just want to get your take on the protestors who gathered at the Shrine of Remembrance yesterday, what’s your reaction to that?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> They might have had their issue and what they were thinking about the thing that concerned them, but they should have reflected on the issues of the mothers and the fathers and the partners and the wives and the sons and daughters who are represented in that Shrine by tens of thousands of Australians who offered the ultimate sacrifice. The Australians who were maimed, basically broken in mind, the families that were broken up, of the lives that were destroyed by reason of service to their nation. It was built, and we could go right back to Sir John Monash who said this is sacred ground and on sacred ground you don’t swear, you don’t throw litter around, you don’t yell and scream. That is not the purpose of the Shrine. The Shrine has a purpose way beyond what the circumstances of those demonstrators were yesterday. Rather than preaching to them, I ask them to reflect. And that’s why Australians – Australians are touchy about very little things, but by gosh they’re very, very aware of the sacredness of a shrine and what it’s there for them and their families and the heritage of their nation. So, you know, you didn’t help your cause at all doing that one.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>PETER STEFANOVIC:</strong> Do you think it was lost on those protestors, and particularly those who don’t want to be vaccinated, that our diggers would have had an array of vaccines before they were deployed?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> That’s right, predominantly to try and keep them alive, to protect them, to protect Australians when they came back. But I think it goes even beyond that, you know, sort of reflecting on the point of vaccines and people’s positions. I’m fully vaccinated. I absolutely support and implore other people, if not for themselves but for the people around them and for our economy to get vaccinated for a common purpose – to get our freedoms and liberties back in the way that we enjoyed them in the past. But way beyond that – way beyond that – our Shrines of Remembrance around the nation are not to be used for a political point for an alternate purpose. Just not. It doesn’t matter whether it’s the shrine at the Walcha Road Hotel, outside the Walcha Road Hotel, between the Walcha Road Hotel and the Walcha Road railway station, or the shrines in so many little country towns, or the shrines in the big cities – they are there and they have strict rules for a real purpose. You’re talking about people’s lives – people’s lives that, just like yours, and they went and offered them for their nation. Really? Why? You can’t desecrate that. I remember being up at Cairns, some kids were skateboarding around the War Memorial, and I just walked up to them and said, “Fellas, do you realise what you’re doing? Like, do you understand?” And I tell you what, I have to credit them – these, you know, kids late at night said, “Yeah, okay, never thought about it that way,” and they went on and went down the street and probably skateboarded somewhere else they’re not supposed to be skateboarding. That’s what I ask of the Australians – those protestors. Just reflect on exactly the deeper meaning to so many people of the place you were at.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>PETER STEFANOVIC:</strong> Barnaby Joyce, some critics have pointed to comments by George Christensen, when he called protestors freedom fighters, suggesting that those comments may well have contributed to the unrest. Do you see it that way?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE: </strong>They are not freedom fighters, they are protestors. I’ve spoken to George a couple of times. I know other people want me to somehow tackle him and, you know, gaffer tape him or something like that. That’s not going to happen because George is a person of his own mind and as a free individual he can do what he likes. But other people can make their choice about whether you agree with him. I don’t agree with him. I’m saying it publicly, and I’ve spoken to George privately first, which I think is the proper way to go about this process. So I say again that they’re not freedom fighters, they have an issue. They might call themselves freedom fighters, but they’re not freedom fighters. Civil disturbance is not going to win you any support, especially civil disturbance where property is damaged, people are threatened, where police are threatened and assaulted, which basically drives division in our nation. If you want to have a cogent debate have a cogent debate. Find the appropriate forums and put forward your cause. You’re totally and utterly entitled to do that, but you’re not entitled to do it at basically completely at odds with the laws that are put down there by the Australian people for the Australian people. And if we don’t have any process there we have anarchy. And if we have anarchy we are not a strong nation. I understand people have different views, and they’re entitled to their different views, but that is not freedom fighting, that’s a public debate on an issue for which I’ll be quite frank I’m on the other side of the debate. I’m on the side of getting yourself inoculated because I want to get on with life, and so does everybody else. We’re over this. We’re sick of being locked down. We’re sick of all the impositions on our freedoms. But the way out of that is to make sure that we don’t end up in a position where our intensive care unit beds at the hospital are full of people and we don’t have the capacity to manage it and save their lives. We want to get for our economy to a position where we can start trading and start paying back some of the debt for the money we’ve borrowed. You know, this is what we’ve got to get to. I want to be able to travel around my nation as a nation – not a heap of hotchpotch parochial states with parochial laws that turn it into some sort of 1850 return to the colonies. That’s not what we’re here for. We’re taking this nation forward. In any decision, in any form of government, there are sacrifices that have to be made. I mean, we all do that in every part of our day. We make sacrifices for the betterment of our nation, and we have to work to a common purpose so that we can be the Australia that we used to be.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>PETER STEFANOVIC:</strong> Joe Biden has apologised to Emanuel Macron overnight for not including him in the AUKUS agreement, Barnaby. Do you think the Prime Minister needs to as well?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> We understand completely the concerns France has. But we have to think once more to our nation first. We have to look at the defence of our nation. Circumstances have changed, and it can’t be on sort of commercial principles to find the best form of platform to defend our nation. That’s not how it works. France knows that as well. They’d do exactly the same thing if they were in a similar position. This issue of French concern, French umbrage, I understand it now, but we share too much – liberty, fraternity, egalitarianism. We share too much to make a contractual arrangement over a submarine bigger than those common essence core purposes – core ideologies that we both have, in a world where those ideologies are fading, in a world where democracy in its pure form and its true form is slipping, in a world where other areas may be called democracies but are slipping towards quasi democracies, of limited capacity of franchise and limited capacity of alternate candidates. France holds that at the core of their being. We hold that at the core of their being. So much so – and I’ve said before – that we have sent our soldiers represented by that Shrine of Remembrance to their nation and to the nations that surround them to protect their nation, to protect those freedoms. And in so doing tens of thousands died. I’m sure that is a bigger issue than a contractual relationship about a submarine.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>PETER STEFANOVIC:</strong> So he doesn’t need to apologise?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> That’s a decision for the Prime Minister, but I don’t think that every time a contract is changed within the terms of the contract – remember, the Prime Minister brought up concerns with this contract. He brought them up some time ago. If a contract is broken, that’s why contracts are written. That’s why they have gateways in contracts. If conditions change and the terms of the contract – remember, we’ve still got to pay penalties. We don’t just walk away from it.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>PETER STEFANOVIC:</strong> Yeah.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> That is contractual relationships. It’s not about apologising.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>PETER STEFANOVIC:</strong> Okay. And just finally, Barnaby – and still with Joe Biden as a matter of fact – he said yesterday that the world is fast approaching a point of no return and that every nation needed to bring their highest possible ambitions to the table when it comes to climate change, and so he wants the highest possible ambitions when it comes to meeting in Glasgow. What do you say to his comments, and will the Nats be supporting a net zero commitment?</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Let’s start with the last thing first – the National Party room is precisely that, and I want the National Party room on any discussions to be part of those discussions and I won’t unilaterally sort of announce a position as the President of the National Party and Leader of the National Party. I’ll discuss with the party I’m a part of about any discussions that might come our way. It’s not like President Biden’s listening to me, I’m sure it’s not like, “Oh, well, we’ll switch everything off and we’ll listen to Barnaby for a second”. We’ve met every agreement that we’ve made – other countries have not. I’m not saying America hasn’t, but other countries have not. We’ve met every agreement that we’ve ever gone into. We also note that we’ve got to make sure that we respect our people and our people make sure we look after their jobs and understand the nature of our economy and where our export dollars come from and make sure we can support our economy to be a good ally. I’m sure that those within the American administration clearly understand that – that a weak Australia is a no-use Australia, and to be a strong Australia we have to have a strong economy, we have to earn the export dollars, we have to be able to support ourselves, and that is also of vital importance in the discussion of this equation.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>PETER STEFANOVIC:</strong> Barnaby Joyce, appreciate your time this morning. Good to see you. Talk to you soon.</p> <p class="Default"><strong>BARNABY JOYCE:</strong> Always a pleasure. Thanks.</p> Joyce Interview with Peter Stefanovic, First Edition, Sky News Bolivia Hill bridge officially opened https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/bolivia-hill-bridge-officially-opened <p>Acting Prime Minister and Member for New England Barnaby Joyce has officially opened a new bridge at Bolivia Hill.</p> <p>The 320-metre-long concrete balanced cantilever bridge fully opened to traffic a fortnight ago and is keeping motorists moving safely and efficiently along the New England Highway between Glen Innes and Tenterfield.</p> <p>Mr Joyce, who is also the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development, visited the site today to mark the completion of the $134 million project.</p> <p>“This is a game-changing piece of infrastructure for our region and it is fantastic to see traffic flowing across the new bridge,” Mr Joyce said.</p> <p>“Around 1,500 vehicles, including 500 heavy vehicles, use this section of highway each day. It is a key route for so many businesses and locals, which is why providing a better and safer highway was so important.</p> <p>“The original section of highway had a poor crash history, but this new route will better connect communities, improve safety and ensure the smooth flow of freight from local agricultural and mining businesses.</p> <p>“Our Government is committed to delivering for the people of New England and the Bolivia Hill bridge is another example of our record $110 billion infrastructure investment plan in action.”</p> <p>The project delivered an economic boost to the region, supporting up to 200 jobs at the peak of construction, including employment for up to 50 locals.</p> <p>The $134 million project was jointly funded by the Australian and New South Wales governments, with the Federal Government providing $98 million and New South Wales Government contributing $36 million.</p> <h2 class="BoswellMediaHeader"><strong>Media contact:</strong></h2> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Deputy Prime Minister – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> Joyce Bolivia Hill bridge officially opened Launceston leading the way in education innovation https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/fletcher/media-release/launceston-leading-way-education-innovation <p>Students in the greater Launceston region are now leading the nation with 600 new innovative Internet of Things (IoT) education kits delivered to 40 states, independent and catholic schools with grades 3-6.</p> <p>Launceston business Bitlink developed the IoT education kits in conjunction with schools in the region.</p> <p>The IoT in Schools education kit was delivered through the Office of the Coordinator-General, with the support of the Commonwealth under the Greater Launceston Transformation Project, which is funded as part of the Launceston City Deal.</p> <p>More information on the Launceston City Deal is available at:<br /> <a href="https://aus01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftas.us20.list-manage.com%2Ftrack%2Fclick%3Fu%3D87871fbd094066173a964fba4%26id%3D8febe411a3%26e%3Db0cdf73736&amp;data=04%7C01%7Cmitchell.haigh%40cg.tas.gov.au%7Cfe2f386c189d453cc60708d97e31a054%7C64ebab8accf44b5ca2d32b4e972d96b2%7C0%7C0%7C637679573875124592%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C1000&amp;sdata=xAPkXMPeamrpCN1E4pgT9Vni7jkB4zbMkTXzRSrf19I%3D&amp;reserved=0">www.infrastructure.gov.au/territories-regions-cities/cities/city-deals/launceston</a></p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to Federal Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and the Arts, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP:</strong></p> <p>“This initiative is one of many being delivered under the $536 million Launceston City Deal, which is helping to position Launceston as a vibrant, liveable, and innovative regional city.</p> <p>“The IoT program will have a significant impact on students across the region, inspiring our next generation of technology and start-up entrepreneurs and preparing them for careers and future studies in STEAM.”</p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to Tasmanian Minister for State Growth, the Hon Roger Jaensch MP:</strong></p> <p>“IoT is a great example of the approach underpinning the Launceston City Deal – that investment in infrastructure and initiatives, whether civil, education or defence, is an important part of making Launceston Australia’s most liveable and innovative city.”</p> <p>“The program is a truly nation-leading initiative that will prepare students for the industries of tomorrow and is already delivering outstanding results for students who have previously struggled with technology.”</p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to Tasmanian Education Minister, the Hon Sarah Courtney MP:</strong></p> <p>“Education is the single most powerful driver for improving economic and social outcomes in Tasmania, and technology plays an incredible role in providing students with the tools to learn.”</p> <p>“By starting at a young age, the IoT in Schools program will assist with learning as well as ensuring pupils are more IT aware.  This also has the opportunity to help them on the early path to some exciting careers that will be major employers when they finish their schooling.”</p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to Federal Member for Bass, Bridget Archer MP:</strong></p> <p> “The IoT kits are a remarkable resource for students in the greater Launceston region.</p> <p>“I look forward to seeing the positive outcomes they will have for students and the flow-on benefits to the Launceston community thanks to the educational boost.</p> <p><strong>Quotes attributable to City of Launceston Mayor, Albert van Zetten:</strong></p> <p>“I am delighted to see school children embracing IoT technology in new and innovative ways.</p> <p>“It's particularly exciting to see our children here in Launceston able to start their journey into STEAM education.</p> <p>“Through the IoT program, our younger generations will have the opportunity to develop their skills and help Launceston achieve its goals of becoming a city of innovation.”</p> Fletcher Launceston leading the way in education innovation Delivering light at the end of the Heysen tunnels https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/delivering-light-end-heysen-tunnels <p class="Introparagraph">A much-needed upgrade of the Heysen Tunnels is set to kick off next year, with a tender for the works released to market.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">The $75 million upgrade to this strategic freight route is being jointly funded by the Australian and South Australian governments. It will support around 155 full-time-equivalent jobs.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">The works will include upgraded lighting and ventilation, a new fire suppression and traffic management systems, an upgraded over-height vehicle detection system, and improved communication systems between the tunnel and Traffic Management Centre.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said the upgrade will ensure traffic continues to flow through the iconic tunnels well into the future.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“The Heysen Tunnels are an iconic piece of South Australia’s road infrastructure,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“Some of the tunnels’ systems are outdated and approaching the end of their service life, which is why we are backing the upgrades to keep the tunnel open and traffic moving safely and efficiently.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“This is another example of the Australian Government’s record $110 billion infrastructure investment plan in action. Through this investment in projects like this one, we are helping to connect communities and improve safety, while creating jobs and supporting our economic recovery.”</p> <p class="Introparagraph">South Australian Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Corey Wingard said the comprehensive upgrade is expected to start in the second quarter of 2022.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“This is a vital project for the safe and productive movement of vehicles and freight on the South Eastern Freeway,” Minister Wingard said.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“The works will also support approximately 155 full-time-equivalent jobs per year during construction, which is great news for our local building industry.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“The Heysen Tunnels are some of the last non-compliant tunnels in the country but, as is their style, the former Labor government ignored the harder projects and refused to touch them.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“The Marshall Liberal Government is delivering the works South Australian motorists deserve, to fix the tunnels and provide a safer, compliant piece of infrastructure.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“This investment will transform and modernise the tunnels to boost road safety and productivity. It will also include repairs to the tunnel lining, and new video and thermal imaging equipment to detect incidents in the tunnel.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">“The tunnels celebrated their 21<sup>st</sup> birthday earlier this year and they are now receiving a much-needed upgrade to improve road safety, efficiency and network reliability for all road users.”</p> <p class="Introparagraph">The upgrade is expected to be completed in late 2023.</p> <p class="Introparagraph">These essential works are in addition to the $35 million South Eastern Freeway Pavement Rehabilitation Project currently underway.</p> <h2 class="BoswellMediaHeader">Media contact:</h2> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Deputy Prime Minister – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Minister Wingard – Gemma Coombe | 0415 175 716 | <a href="mailto:Gemma.Coombe@sa.gov.au">Gemma.Coombe@sa.gov.au</a></p> Joyce Delivering light at the end of the Heysen tunnels Planning for new water infrastructure in Central Queensland https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/planning-new-water-infrastructure-central-queensland <p>The Liberal and Nationals Government is funding preliminary business cases for two water infrastructure projects in Central Queensland, which could bolster water reliability and provide the additional water needed to grow local agricultural and primary industries.</p> <p>Through the National Water Grid Fund, the Government is providing $3.7 million to fully fund investigations into the future construction and upgrades of water infrastructure.</p> <p>The funding includes:</p> <ul> <li>$2 million towards the Paranui Weir preliminary business case; and</li> <li>$1.7 million towards the Bedford Weir Raising preliminary business case.</li> </ul> <p>The preliminary business case for the Paranui Weir will investigate options for a new weir along the Dawson River with a storage capacity of 11.5 gigalitres, equivalent to more than 4,500 Olympic swimming pools.</p> <p>The preliminary business case for the Bedford Weir Raising project will explore the benefits and viability of raising the current weirs wall by 1.2 metres, which would increase water storage capacity by five gigalitres.</p> <p>Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said this latest funding demonstrates the Government’s commitment to delivering the reliable water farmers and agricultural producers in Queensland need to thrive.</p> <p>“Water supply and security helps form the backbone of so many Central Queensland communities, underpinning local agricultural and primary businesses, jobs, economies and the home-grown food and fibre much of Australia and the world enjoys,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p>"That's why we’ve put this funding on the table, to take the first step towards increasing local water supply and security by delivering the planning work needed to identify the right water infrastructure for Central Queensland.</p> <p>“This builds on the range of construction projects and business cases we are already investing in across the state under our $3.5 billion National Water Grid Fund.”</p> <p>Federal Member for Flynn Ken O’Dowd said water was like gold for local farmers and their communities, which is why the Government is continuing to help deliver quality, reliable water to paddocks in our regions.</p> <p>“The Paranui Weir could provide the additional water needed to meet future irrigation demand across up to 30,000 hectares of land, to support agricultural and primary industry growth in the region,” Mr O’Dowd said.</p> <p>“And the Bedford Weir Raising project would improve water reliability in the Nagoa Mackenzie Water Supply Scheme, benefitting agricultural producers across the region.</p> <p>“The Nagoa Mackenzie Water Supply Scheme services the water needs of many Central Queensland communities, supplying irrigation water for a variety of locally grown food as well as underpinning local mining operations.</p> <p>“I know just how vital the benefits of these projects could be for all these local industries, their workers and the communities that rely on them, which is why we are committing the funds needed to deliver the preliminary business cases.</p> <p>"Our investments in the National Water Grid are all about supporting regional economic growth, employment and prosperity and I’m pleased to be backing that here for Central Queensland.”</p> <p>By investing in 70 construction projects and more than 60 business cases, the Australian Government’s National Water Grid Fund is paving the way to national water security, while promoting local economic activity and job creation.</p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">For more information on the National Water Grid, visit <a href="http://www.nationalwatergrid.gov.au/">www.nationalwatergrid.gov.au</a>.</p> <h2 class="BoswellMediaHeader"><strong>Media contact:</strong></h2> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Deputy Prime Minister – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader">Mr O’Dowd – Electorate Office | (07) 4972 5465</p> Joyce Planning for new water infrastructure in Central Queensland Macquarie Street upgrades complete https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/macquarie-street-upgrades-complete <p>Road users may have noticed that Macquarie Street, in Gracemere’s Industrial Area, has had a makeover thanks to over half a million dollars from the Australian Government.</p> <p>The most recent upgrades to the Gracemere Industrial Area (GIA) were wrapped up in May and have added Macquarie Street, between Douglas Street and Middle Road to the list of areas improved through the project designed to enhance access to the area.</p> <p>The works included road improvements and the upgrade of the pre-existing floodway to accommodate higher productivity vehicles.</p> <p>Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said the works are the third and final stage of the major upgrade project, achieved through the Australian Government’s Bridges Renewal Program and Rockhampton Regional Council.</p> <p>“This project is a great example of what the Federal Liberal and Nationals Government’s Bridges Renewal investment is all about – upgrading and replacing bridges to connect communities and reduce freight costs for businesses,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p>“That’s why we’re putting over $760 million over a decade toward this program, with an ongoing commitment of at least $85 million a year from 2025 onwards.”</p> <p>Rockhampton Region Mayor Tony Williams said the Macquarie Street project was a great example of what can be achieved when two levels of government work together to benefit the region.</p> <p>“The upgrades to Macquarie Street were made possible thanks to a $585,377 investment from the Australian Government’s Round 5 of the Bridges Renewal Program,” Mayor Williams said.</p> <p>“This particular project means improved access to the GIA B-Double Route and wider State Highway Network which means heavy vehicles can now move through the area much easier.</p> <p>“The GIA is one of Queensland’s premier transport and logistics hubs, and it brings numerous benefits to the region.”</p> <p>Infrastructure and Divisional Councillor Ellen Smith said road users have had nothing but positive feedback since the upgrades were completed.</p> <p>“The improvements to the GIA mean increased safety for road users, more jobs, more growth, and ensuring key freight routes are more efficient which saves businesses time and money,” Cr Smith said.</p> <p>“Thanks to the upgrades we will see higher returns and bigger investments in our region which is a win for our community.”</p> <p>The Macquarie Street upgrade project was jointly funded by the Australian Government Round 5 of the Bridge Renewal Program and Rockhampton Regional Council.</p> <p>More information on the Bridges Renewal Program is available <a href="https://investment.infrastructure.gov.au/about/local-initiatives/bridges-renewal-program.aspx">here</a>. </p> Joyce Macquarie Street upgrades complete Residents reap benefits of Rockhampton Northern Access Upgrade https://minister.infrastructure.gov.au/joyce/media-release/residents-reap-benefits-rockhampton-northern-access-upgrade <p class="MsoNormal">The Bruce Highway north of Rockhampton has undergone a massive facelift, making it faster for locals to get in and out of the city’s northern suburbs.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">The $158 million Rockhampton Northern Access Upgrade (RNAU) is now finished, with the stretch widened to four lanes between Rockhampton-Yeppoon Road and Ramsay Creek.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">This major upgrade has been made possible by $126.4 million in funding from the Australian Government, while the Queensland Government provided $31.6 million.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Barnaby Joyce said the Australian Government is delivering the infrastructure upgrades Queenslanders need and deserve.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“We are committed to investing in road upgrades to improve safety, deliver better road access for users and support growth and connectivity across Queensland,” the Deputy Prime Minister said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“This is another example of the Australian Government’s record $110 billion infrastructure investment plan in action, helping to connect communities and improve safety, while creating jobs and supporting our economic recovery.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Queensland Transport and Main Roads Minister Mark Bailey said the RNAU paved the way for the upcoming Rockhampton Ring Road.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“Over the next four years the Queensland Government is delivering a record $27.5 billion roads and transport plan which is creating 24,000 jobs and driving the state’s economic recovery from COVID-19,” Mr Bailey said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“This includes delivering $17.5 billion worth of project across regional Queensland.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“With the $158 million Rockhampton Northern Access Upgrade now complete, we move onto the delivery of the biggest infrastructure project to ever be delivered in Central Queensland – the Rockhampton Ring Road.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Federal Member for Capricornia Michelle Landry said the completion of both the Rockhampton Northern Access Upgrade and the $36 million Highway Safety Package project at Terranova Drive would ensure a safe and efficient journey for all road users.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“The Rockhampton Northern Access Upgrade has addressed the traffic demand on the Bruce Highway, with about 12,750 vehicles per day, including 1,460 heavy vehicles, travelling through Parkhurst,” Ms Landry said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“Rockhampton is one of many communities from Brisbane to Cairns benefitting from our investment of over $10 billion in a safer, smoother and more reliable Bruce Highway.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“This investment also includes the Rockhampton Ring Road, which is the missing link to complete the overall Bruce Highway infrastructure upgrades to improve access in and around the city.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Federal Member for Flynn Ken O’Dowd said the RNAU will improve the Bruce Highway network, improve safety and provide capacity and resilience on this stretch of road.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“This project is invaluable to support the economic development of our regional areas,” Mr O’Dowd said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“The Rockhampton Northern Access Road will offer active transport options for residents in the area.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Queensland Member for Rockhampton Barry O’Rourke said the Rockhampton Ring Road project would give a big boost to many local businesses in the city.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“With construction kicking off in the new year, we’ll need local contractors and suppliers to deliver the works,” Mr O’Rourke said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“We want Central Queensland to reap the economic rewards when the Palaszczuk Government delivers the Rockhampton Ring Road project.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Queensland Member for Keppel Brittany Lauga said the Palaszczuk Government is delivering for Central Queensland by creating jobs.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“We saw 255 jobs supported by the RNAU and expect construction of the Rockhampton Ring Road will support an average of 783 direct jobs,” Ms Lauga said.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">“The best way the Queensland Government can deliver these major infrastructure projects is through collaborating with industry and proactively highlighting opportunities for local businesses to participate.”</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Ms Lauga said the Queensland Government was continuing to deliver major infrastructure upgrades that were identified in the Fitzroy River Floodplain and Road Planning Study (2011), supporting future growth in the Rockhampton region.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">Since the study was completed, $524 million has been directly injected into upgrading Rockhampton's road network. This includes:</p> <ul> <li class="MsoNormal">The $50 million Yeppen North project, started in 2013, and $148 million Yeppen South project, started in 2015, with both completed. Yeppen South alone supported an average of 200 direct jobs over the life of the project.</li> <li class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle">Improving access to Rockhampton from the south and providing a high-level of flood immunity for the Bruce Highway through the southern Fitzroy River floodplain into Rockhampton.</li> <li class="MsoListParagraphCxSpMiddle">Last month saw the completion of the $75 million Capricorn Highway – Rockhampton to Gracemere Duplication, which supported an average of 187 direct jobs over the life of the project. The duplication has improved the connection between these communities and increased the safety of this key urban connector road.</li> <li class="MsoListParagraphCxSpLast">The $158 million Rockhampton Northern Access Upgrade (RNAU) and $36 million Bruce Highway Safety Package project at Terranova Drive are in the final construction stages and when complete will reduce congestion and improve access in the northern suburbs of Rockhampton.  255 direct jobs are being supported over the life of the RNAU project and an average of 165 direct jobs by the Terranova Drive intersection project.</li> </ul> <h2 class="BoswellMediaHeader"><strong>Media contact:</strong></h2> <p class="BoswellMediaHeader"><strong>Deputy Prime Minister</strong> – Antony Perry | 0477 971 654 | <a href="mailto:Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au">Antony.Perry@infrastructure.gov.au</a></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong>Minister Bailey </strong>– Toby Walker | 0439 347 875 | <a href="mailto:toby.walker@ministerial.qld.gov.au">toby.walker@ministerial.qld.gov.au</a></p> Joyce Residents reap benefits of Rockhampton Northern Access Upgrade