Governments partnering to deliver additional upgrades to Dampier Peninsula roads

The Australian and Western Australian Governments are keen to continue the success of the Broome Cape Leveque Project, with additional funding now allocated to continue upgrades to access roads.

An additional $15 million has been allocated to reconstruct the first 13.6 kilometres of the old narrow seal on the Broome Cape Leveque Road and to upgrade the intersection at Broome Highway.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Michael McCormack said the project was part of the Australian Government's commitment to regional Western Australia.

"The Australian Government will always back our regions which is why we have worked to fund another two projects along the Dampier Peninsula, creating even more employment and training opportunities," the Deputy Prime Minister said.

"The Federal Government is committed to ensuring the West receives its fair share of our record $110 billion nationwide infrastructure investment, which is laying the foundations for economic recovery following the pandemic."

Western Australian Minister for Transport Rita Saffioti said she was proud the McGowan Government could continue delivering these works with local Aboriginal employment.

"The work undertaken on Broome Cape Leveque Road provided many fantastic employment and training opportunities for local people," Ms Saffioti said.

"I'm pleased we have been able to provide additional funding to provide continuity of work for these workers."

Federal Member for Durack Melissa Price said additional upgrades would mean even more tourism opportunities for the Dampier Peninsula.

"Broome is a tourism drawcard and more and more tourists are being drawn to the Dampier Peninsula," Ms Price said.

"These upgrades will make it safer for tourists and create more opportunities for our local communities."

State Member for the Kimberley region Josie Farrer said she was proud to belong to a State Government committed to delivering outcomes for Aboriginal people.

"The opportunities that have been available for the local community to be part of Main Roads work in the Kimberley are impressive and will continue on other projects in the future," Ms Farrer said.

"I'm pleased we have been able to contribute additional funds for more of these important projects."

Funding has also recently been allocated to sealing the Kooljaman Resort Access Road at Cape Leveque and Ardyaloon Hatchery Access Road at Ardyaloon, with the $5 million project commencing in the middle of next year.

The Kooljaman Access Road provides a link to one of the Kimberley's most iconic areas, on Bardi Jawi country; this unique landscape boasts pristine beaches with rich red cliffs running alongside.

Access to the area is often restricted for locals and visitors due to rainfall, rutting and soft pindan.

Situated at the tip of the Peninsula, the Ardyaloon Hatchery Access Road links to the equally significant Ardyaloon Hatchery, which was established in 1988 as a research station for the trochus niloticus fishery.

Since then, the hatchery is successfully restocking juvenile trochus and has become popular with tourists, with almost 20,000 people visiting annually.

Much like Kooljaman, access to Ardyaloon is often restricted, affecting the local people and visitors to the area, making these upgrades important to the community.

The upgrades will make both roads suitable for two-wheel-drive vehicles, improving the visitor experience to the Dampier Peninsula.

The $20 million Broome-Cape Leveque Road Upgrading and Community Access Roads project is jointly funded by the Australian Government committing $16 million and the Western Australian Government $4 million. The upgrades are expected to be completed by the end of next year.