Ministers for the Department of Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities The Hon Michael McCormack MP Deputy Prime MinisterMinister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development Senator the Hon Bridget McKenzie Minister for Regional ServicesMinister for SportMinister for Local Government and Decentralisation The Hon Alan Tudge MP Minister for Cities, Urban Infrastructure and Population The Hon Sussan Ley MP Assistant Minister for Regional Development and Territories The Hon Andrew Gee MP Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister The Hon Andrew Broad MP Former Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister The Hon Scott Buchholz MP Assistant Minister for Roads and Transport The Hon Barnaby Joyce MPFormer Deputy Prime MinisterFormer Minister for Infrastructure and Transport The Hon Dr John McVeigh MPFormer Minister for Regional Development, Territories and Local Government The Hon Keith Pitt MPFormer Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister The Hon Damian Drum MPFormer Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister Senator the Hon Fiona Nash Former Minister for Regional DevelopmentFormer Minister for Local Government and Territories The Hon Darren Chester MP Former Minister for Infrastructure and TransportFormer A/g Minister for Regional DevelopmentFormer A/g Minister for Local Government and Territories The Hon Warren Truss MP Former Deputy Prime Minister Former Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development The Hon Paul Fletcher MP Former Minister for Urban Infrastructure and Cities The Hon Jamie Briggs MP Former Assistant Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development

Young Adults and Road Safety

Media Release

JB004/2013

29 October 2013

While young adults remain over-represented in road crashes worldwide, the number of road fatalities among young adults in Australia has reduced significantly in the last five years, figures released today by the Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics reveal.

Young Adults and Road Safety shows the population based rate for road deaths of young adults worldwide is more than 50 per cent higher than for all age groups. In developed countries, road crashes account for around a quarter of all deaths in the 15–24 years age group.

However, the figures for Australia are encouraging.

During the last five years in Australia, road crash fatalities of young adults have improved by 29 per cent. This improvement is stronger than that of any other age group.

Young adults nevertheless remain over-represented compared to other age groups. In Australia, the population based rate for road deaths of young adults is 56 per cent higher than for all age groups.

Young Adults and Road Safety confirms that fatal crashes involving the death of a young adult are more likely to occur on the weekend and night-time hours.

One life lost on the roads is one too many; no family member or friend should have to go through the trauma and heartbreak of losing someone they love in a crash on our roads.

Road safety is the responsibility of everyone who travels on our roads, from the driver to passengers, and all levels of government.

Giving young drivers the skills and knowledge to get home in one piece is vital from the outset—one of the reasons the Coalition Government is delivering another $10 million to the Keys2Drive programme.

The Keys2Drive programme aims to improve driver safety by building a foundation for a life of safe driving. The programme includes a free lesson, professional development and accreditation for the driving instruction industry, and online support to guide learner and supervising drivers.

The Young Adults and Road Safety information sheet is available at www.bitre.gov.au and information on Keys2Drive is available at www.keys2drive.com.au.