Unleashing $2.5 million to manage wild dogs in WA

Media Release

FN024/2017

04 March 2017

Joint release with:

Barnaby Joyce

Deputy Prime Minister
Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources

  • $1.5 million over two years from 2017–18 to assist Western Australia with wild dog management capacity building activities, part of a $50 million investment in the Ag White Paper
  • $1 million over two years from 2017–18 for wild dog control across drought-affected areas of WA, part of a $25.8 million investment in the Ag White Paper
  • This announcement is on top of more than $3.4 million the Australian Government has already committed to pest animal and weed control across both programs in WA in 2015–16 and 2016–17

Western Australian farmers and landholders will be better able to manage the impacts wild dogs have on their properties, with a $2.5 million boost from the Coalition Government for increased control measures.

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, Barnaby Joyce, said the funding, part of the Agricultural Competitiveness White Paper, would help lessen the economic and emotional toll of wild dogs.

“Wild dogs cause terrible distress for farmers and landholders, killing livestock, reducing farm profits and causing emotional anguish,” Minister Joyce said.

“They are estimated to cost our agriculture sector up to $89 million each year with direct costs from livestock losses, control measures and disease transmission.

“That's why the Coalition Government is supporting a two-pronged effort to manage wild dogs over the next two years, consistent with Western Australia's Wild Dog Action Plan.

“There's a $1.5 million project which will contribute to the Western Australian Action Plan by supporting landholders to increase their capacity to manage wild dogs, including by working more effectively with industry and community biosecurity groups.

“A further $1 million will provide contestable grants for the Western Australian Government to deliver regionally based and managed wild dog fencing projects.

“Western Australian farmers will benefit from improved stock management and increased profitability through this work, which will also provide employment and economic opportunities to regional communities.”

Minister for Regional Development, Fiona Nash, said the Coalition Government was serious about supporting landholders to manage pests and weeds.

“As a farmer myself, I know first-hand how devastating the impact of feral animals can be on livestock or how pest weed invasions can drastically cut a crop's yield.

“I am pleased to be part of a government that has shown an unprecedented commitment to reducing some of the impacts that weeds and pest animals have on farmers and their livelihoods,” Minister Nash said.

“We are also a government that backs up its commitments with real investment, which is why the Ag White Paper included $50 million for management of established pest animals and weeds, and a further $25.8 million specifically for pest animals and weeds in drought-affected areas.”

Fast facts

  • Wild dogs are estimated to cost our agriculture sector up to $89 million per year with direct costs through livestock losses, control measures and disease transmission. It is especially traumatic for farmers who are affected by drought.
  • The Agricultural Competitiveness White Paper has invested:
    • $50 million over four years to tackle established pest animals and weeds
    • A further $25.8 million specifically for pest animals and weeds in areas still feeling the on-going impacts of drought—the Australian Government has already rolled out $19 million worth of projects under this drought-specific funding.
  • Through the White Paper funding, the Australian Government is providing $2.5 million for wild dog management activities in Western Australia over two years from 2017–18 to 2018–19.
  • The WA Government is receiving $2.43 million under the Managing Established Pest Animals and Weeds initiative for 2015–16 and 2016–17, allocated across six projects.
  • This is on top of $500,000 already provided to Western Australia under the White Paper in 2015–16 for pest animal and weed management in drought-affected areas, and $500,000 committed in 2016–17 to undertake wild dog, cacti and feral pig control in the Mid West region.
  • The Western Australian Government has committed up to $20 million to implement the actions in Western Australia's Wild Dog Action Plan.