Indigenous mural unveiled in Silo Art Trail series

Media Release

FN088/2016

25 November 2016

Joint release with:

Andrew Broad

Federal member for Mallee

  • The third mural as part of the Silo Art Trail has been revealed at the Sheep Hills silos in northern Wimmera.
  • World renowned street artist Matt Adnate created the piece which depicts members of the Barengi Gadjin community.
  • The series of six giant murals is set to invigorate tourism in north-west Victoria.

A huge 30m x 40m Indigenous mural celebrating members of the Barengi Gadjin community has been unveiled at the Sheep Hills silo in north-west Victoria, highlighting the importance of indigenous heritage throughout this region.

Minister for Regional Development Fiona Nash said the visually inspiring community initiative sees huge murals painted on silos across a 200 kilometre stretch of the Wimmera-Mallee, attracting tourists from across the nation.

“The Coalition Government is investing $200,000 towards this project which has been commissioned to bring social, cultural and economic benefits to the region via art and tourism,” Minister Nash said.

“I aim to help build the kinds of rural communities our children and grandchildren want to either stay in or come back to, and a diverse economy with unique attractions definitely helps do that.

“These silos will build on the Brim silo art project completed late last year, which feature portraits that tower over 30 metres high, and have already become an icon in regional Victoria.”

The mural, set to be complete in coming days, celebrates Indigenous art, history and knowledge sharing through the depiction of Barengi Gadjin Indigenous Elders Uncle Ron Marks and Aunty Regina Hood, alongside two children from the community.

Federal Member for Mallee Andrew Broad said the completed Brim and Patchewollock silos have already shown how a creative project can transform an area and its community and ignite exciting conversations.

“The Silo Art Trail provides a striking visual representation of the changing face of the region and has already attracted thousands of local, interstate and international visitors to the region since the Brim Silo was completed in December 2015,” Mr Broad said.

Street artist Matt Adnate, who is celebrated for his work with Indigenous communities, has spent time with the Barengi Gadjin community to conceive and complete the Sheep Hills silo mural.

“The design of the Sheep Hills silo mural represents the passing on of knowledge and local Indigenous history from Elder to the next generation within the community; as well as depicting elements of local dreaming and the passing of time,” Adnate said.

“It aims to articulate and celebrate the identity of the many young Indigenous members who live in the local Sheep Hills community—an identity that many of them grapple with.

“I wanted to highlight and celebrate these young people and the significant connection they share with their Elders. The Sheep Hills silo mural is the largest work I've ever created and to do it in such a special place and with such an extraordinary group of people is very humbling.”

Future silos to be unveiled as part of the Silo Art Trail include Lascelles, Roseberry and Rupanyup and will include work by artists Rone and Julia Volchkova.

The Silo Art Trail project is being funded by the Coalition Government's Drought Communities Programme ($200,000) and the Victorian Government ($200,000), with the giant canvases (silos) provided by GrainCorp.

To keep up to date with the Silo Art Trail project visit: www.facebook.com/siloarttrail/